Flash Fiction Challenge: 200 Words At A Time, The Final Chapter


First round is right here.

Second round is right here.

Third round: boom, right here.

And the fourth round is now within clicking range.

The end is here.

It has been a wonderfully weird experiment and I think, actually, pretty successful.

Time to bring this badboy home.

The rules are simple:

Look through the 800-word entries from last week (round four, linked above).

Pick one.

Add another 200 words to the story. The final 200 words, actually.

(Easiest way forward is to copy the chosen 800 words to your own blog, then add the next 200. Don’t forget to link to the now-finished tale in the comments.)

You do not need to have participated in the earlier rounds to participate in this one.

This time around, as noted, you will finish the story. And! And you are free to work on a story to which you have previously contributed, preferably one whose initial 200 words were yours to begin with. (Meaning, while not necessary, it’ll be interesting for you to finish the story that you began but whose middle is penned by three other writers.)

This is a collaborative game. It is Whisper Down the Lane. It is Telephone.

And now it’s time to finish up.

You’ve got one week.

Due by Friday, December 27th, noon EST.

Add the final link to the narrative chain, won’t you?


123 responses to “Flash Fiction Challenge: 200 Words At A Time, The Final Chapter”

  1. Ok, I’ve written a part five to Meagan Wilson’s story of Stewart the Demon. I think someone in one of the other versions titled it “Stewart”, which I’ve used just for the sake of convenience. Read the exciting conclusion HERE.
    Chills!
    Thrills!
    Surprises!

      • I did try to keep it to 200 words, but it was near impossible. So, I edited the best I could and posted it… 😀 I’m happy with how it turned out. And I loved how the skeletons exploded all the time 😀

        I’d love to try this kind of thing out again… this was very cool! 😀

  2. Hi all,

    I myself haven’t picked a story yet for Part 5…. But I thought I’d leave a brief plug here (if I may! : ) for Parts 1-4 that still need some love. Perhaps others would like to leave links here to their incomplete stories, too.

    HOUSE OF MEMORY, a(n epic?) fantasy, still needs Parts 4 & 5. http://courtcan.com/writing/new-flash-fiction-challenge-200-words/.

    COLD, a vampire mystery, needs Part 5. http://courtcan.com/writing/flash-fiction-challenge-continuing-someone-elses-story-part-2/.

    MILLIONS OF CATS, a funny sci-fi, needs Part 5. http://courtcan.com/writing/flash-fiction-challenge-continuing-someone-elses-story-part-4/.

    Anyone else? Happy writing, y’all!

  3. What a blast these past five weeks have been! I hope Chuck decides to host another challenge like this in the future.

    After reading through several stories, I just could not resist this one, entitled “Silk,” assembled by murgatroid98, LC Hu, Jeremy Podolski and Megan Wilson, respectively. The first 800 words were not only really well-written, but visceral and intriguing. I had a lot of fun with this.

    My 200+ word contribution brings this story to a “conclusion.” http://jeremiahboydstun.com/2013/12/22/200-words-the-final-edition/

  4. Hi Chuck,

    Congratulations for Terrible Minds being named one of the Top 10 Blogs for Writers for 2013. This is indeed an honor since according to Mary Jaksch, chief editor of Write to Done, the sponsor of the contest, over 1,100 writers nominated their favorite blogs.

  5. One little glitch to your idea, Chuck…. what happens if you can’t find your original first 200 words being continued past the second continuation? I tried finding mine each week after week 2, and never found ‘The Apocolyptic Bounty Hunter’ continued to the end… so I can’t find out how it worked out or who worked on it. 🙁

    • My piece from round one didn’t get continued, so I just picked a different story that had caught my eye, same as I’d been doing for all the previous rounds. Or you could pick one that you added to for round two, three, or four instead if one of those got carried all the way through. Not all the stories got carried through to the end and there are people who didn’t participate in the early rounds who might want to dive in here at the end of the game too, so I think plenty of people will be picking stories they didn’t start to finish. I don’t think you *have* to finish your round one piece for round five, just that it would be a neat thing to do if you wanted to,

  6. As with last week, I’d love to help update those stories stuck fast in previous parts. Post a link to yours, no matter how far it’s along, and I’ll bring it a step forwards (assuming I haven’t already added to it, of course).

    Let’s get some more of you involved, too – it’d be great if we could bring closure to each and every story that was started way back in week one.

    • I loved it and am honoured it continued to the end. I must say I never thought it would turn into a horror story! Just goes to show you how creative you people are. Thanks.

    • I like your conclusion, Josh! Mozette had written one as well, so it’s really neat to see the different endings. Each one brings something intriguing to the table and casts the story in a different light. A great example of how cool this whole project is!

    • I wasn’t expecting it go in that direction, but at the same time, given what I know about most parents, it’s totally appropriate. Good work!

  7. Tying things up in 200 words was very hard. My first draft of a conclusion was better, but was more like 600 words!

  8. […] Chuck Wendig‘s crazed version of “Telephone” in story form is finally at an end. The concept is that each person writes 200 words of a story and that same story is picked up by another writer and so on and so forth until we reached 1,000 words. I’ve been part of five stories over these past five weeks and it’s been great fun seeing how the stories have developed and morphed from the originals. I concluded a story by Adrienne, j, Smoph, and Joyce. You can read it below. It was previously untitled, but I’m going to call it “The Hunted.” […]

  9. I chose an originally untitled story by the following authors:

    Joe Donahue wrote Part 1.
    Morag Donnachie wrote Part 2.
    Jeremiah Boydstun wrote Part 3.
    Justice wrote Part 4 and gave the story the title “The Veteran.”

    Part 5, my conclusion, is here:
    http://courtcan.com/writing/flash-fiction-challenge-continuing-someone-elses-story-part-5/. I don’t know if any of the other authors thought of the story as sci-fi, but that’s definitely how it wrapped up. Which is a woot in my book. 😉

    Chuck, thanks so much for creating this challenge. It’s been cramazing fun, and it’s made December a great writing-month for me. Already a fantastic start to my New Year. PENMONKEYS FTW.

  10. I chose to take the option of finishing the story that I started four weeks ago. I want to thank Michael D. Woods, Liz Neering, and Kyra Dune for their contributions, as well as Angela Carina Barry for her alternate take in Week Two. Here’s the conclusion of “Winter Takes All”.

    http://pauljwillett.com/2013/12/26/flash-fiction-the-final-two-hundred-words/

    Chuck, thanks for doing this every week and giving us something to hone our skills on. Without challenges like this we would be much the poorer, unable to use your playground to dare to fail magnificently.

  11. I’m a late arrival, just found the thread this week. I finished the creepy story about the Black Dot / Cup of Comfort Coffee Shop. Thanks for the original four writers for making such an intriguing tale.

    Part 1: Josee De Angelis
    Part 2: Liz Neering
    Part 3: Ken Crump
    Part 4: (name unknown) here’s the last link: http://www.blueinkalchemy.com/2013/12/16/flash-fiction/.

    Part 5: Me. http://roktyping.blogspot.kr/2013/12/flash-fiction-part-5-black-dotcup-of.html

    This was a lot of fun. Thanks, Chuck.

  12. I’m disappointed that, even with six days off, I wasn’t able to finish one of these off in time. Oh well, back to work tomorrow, and I can write when it’s quiet, and read all the finished stories.

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