The Key To It All: In Which Pocoyo Explains The Power Of Story And Imagination

 

(Link in case you can’t see the embed.)

The toddler loves this show, Pocoyo.

Oh, fuck it, who am I kidding? We love it. Shut up. That cartoon kid’s cute. The duck’s awesome.

Don’t judge me, Judgey McJudgerson.

Anyway.

The above episode: I want you to watch it. I mean, I’m going to spoil it here anyway, but it’s worth your eyes. It’s like, five minutes long or something — just hunker down and commit the time.

Done?

Done.

If ever there’s been something that explains the mighty power of the imagination, it’s this episode. Pocoyo gets a key with the promise that it will open pirate’s treasure — the chest that he eventually discovers the key will open is in fact just filled with more keys.

More keys that open more treasure.

The key opens treasure and the treasure is MORE KEYS.

Holy crap. That’s it.

That is the endless bounty of the imagination.

That is the power of story. One key that leads to more keys — and each key the promise of a new journey, a new story lived, experienced, and then told. A series of doors and chests and the journey to get to them and get through them. Doors and chests that cannot merely be opened but must be unlocked. And what’s powerful is the story surrounding how we unlock those chests and doors.

Fuck yeah.

That is all. You may now go about your day. I just wanted to point you toward this.

19 comments

  • I love this. I love what you said. “That is the power of story. One key that leads to more keys — and each key the promise of a new journey, a new story lived, experienced, and then told. A series of doors and chests and the journey to get to them and get through them. Doors and chests that cannot merely be opened but must be unlocked. And what’s powerful is the story surrounding how we unlock those chests and doors.” I love Stephen Fry. I shall now go about my day with a huge smile on my face.

  • You’re right. Pato is awesome, motherfucker. Finally, someone who knows how cool a grumpy duck can be. Well, you know. Aside from George Lucas. For the longest time I thought he was the only one that got me. Now I know that our souls sing in harmony, Chuck, a beautiful melody that lifts us to summer fields and endless warm breezes.

    Ellie, on the other hand, can suck a dick.

  • I’ve loved Stephen Fry for years. Listening to him as the narrator on Pocoyo has made him even funnier, somehow, like how you’d here those thing coming from Mr. Conductor’s mouth during a George Carlin routine.

    If you haven’t had the pleasure, all of you should watch Stephen Fry in America, but only after you’ve watched several episodes of Pocoyo beforehand. In the series, he takes a roadtrip that hits every state, and it is simply brilliant.

  • If you haven’t had the joy yet, Chuck, hunt down the episode of Wonder Pets where they teach a puppy how to take a piss. I warn you though: if lately you have had a hankering for tasting deer slugs, lock your guns up because this show will drive you right over the edge.

    And then back over you a few times. And then make you blow up. Then reconstitute you, chop you up, ship you to a third world country is seventeen different UPS containers, stitch you back together, frappe you, and then enjoy you on a cold night in front of the fireplace with some Kenny G.

  • Pocoyo has an adorable style (and Stephen Fry! Stephen Fryyyy!).
    Not ashamed to say that, despite not having kids, I will totally watch it if it comes on the TV.

  • We occasionally get episodes of it on TV here but I’ve never really watched it. I didn’t realise till now the narrator was Stephen Fry! That’s an even more awesome revelation than discovering Julian Clary was the narrator of “The Little Princess”!

    Which is not to say I missed your point, but … Stephen Fry!

  • I fucking love Pocoyo, mainly because Stephan Fry but that cartoon is so sweet. I love being British, we have cool people :) awesome point by the way, imagination and stuff.

  • That was marvelous! I loved Stephen Fry’s narration and I loved the story. I’d never heard of Pocoyo before, but now I have to introduce him to my grandson. Thank you for sharing that.

  • Perfect said. I could not have said it any better myself, “That is the power of story. One key that leads to more keys — and each key the promise of a new journey, a new story lived, experienced, and then told.” This is the real secret to all writing.

    Thanks for the post! :]

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